Sleep Wellness

Sleep is one of life’s little necessities.

Quality sleep is essential for good health. It can optimize your physical, mental & emotional well-being. The sleep you get at night has a significant impact on your energy, mood and productivity during the day. One of the key ingredients to quality sleep is a comfortable and supportive mattress.

At Sealy, we understand the importance of a good night’s sleep and we are committed to your sleep wellness. So whether you are here for yourself or someone you care about, we invite you to use this section as a resource for researching sleep matters on kids, teens, adults & seniors.

For additional information on sleep wellness, you can visit the National Sleep Foundation at www.sleepfoundation.org or visit the Better Sleep Council Canada at www.bettersleep.ca. You may also want to consult with your family doctor for severe sleeping concerns.

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Kids and Sleep

You tuck them in. You read them stories. You sing them lullabies. Children rely on parents for many of their sleep needs. Some you may not be even aware of. To help you understand why sleep is so important to your child & how you can help him or her sleep better, we’ve assembled a variety of information that you can review on your own, or together with your young one.

Avoid bedtime battles

Sleep is a vital need, essential to a child’s health & growth. Sleep promotes alertness, memory & performance. Children who get enough sleep are more likely to function better and are less prone to behavioral problems and moodiness. That’s why it’s important for parents to start early and help their children develop good sleep habits. Toddlers (1-3 years) need about 12-14 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period. School-age children, ages 5 to 12, require 10-11 hours of sleep.

Understand your child’s sleep habits

For newborns, sleep during the early months occurs around the clock, and the sleep-wake cycle interacts with the need to be fed, changed and nurtured. Newborns sleep a total of 10.5 to 18 hours a day on an irregular schedule with periods of 1 to 3 hours spent awake.

By the age of two, most children have spent more time asleep than awake, and, overall, a child will spend 40 percent of his or her childhood asleep.

School-age children, ages 5 to 12, require 10-11 hours of sleep. During this age, most children are also experiencing increasing demand on their time from school, in the form of homework, sports and other extracurricular and social activities. This all can add up to difficulties falling asleep, nightmares and disruptions to their sleep.

Over-scheduled Kids

Kids who spend more time in extracurricular activities at the expense of sleep time simply do not perform as they should. Recognize when your child is over scheduled. Make compromises when it comes to your child’s extracurricular activities instead of when it comes to sleep. There are no easy choices. School-age children, ages 5 to 12, require 10-11 hours of sleep.

10 simple sleep tips for kids

  1. Sleep on a good bed like Sealy Posturepedic.
  2. Make bedtime the same time every night.
  3. Help your child develop a nighttime routine.
  4. Bedtime should be a positive & relaxing experience without TV, videos or computers.
  5. Encourage your child to fall asleep on his or her own.
  6. Make your child’s bedroom conductive to sleep - dark & cool.
  7. Ensure your child gets the proper amount of sleep every night.
  8. Ensure there is enough time to wind down before bedtime.
  9. Invest in a full size or queen size bed instead of a twin.
  10. Talk to your children about the importance of sleep and healthy sleep habits.

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Teens and Sleep

Did your teen get enough sleep last night? With school, sports, part-time jobs, homework and more, most teens do not lack for things to do. But, with so much on the agenda, how can they be at their best every day? No surprise, it begins with a good night’s sleep.

The consequences of poor sleep

Evidence suggests that teenagers are indeed seriously sleep deprived. A 2006 poll conducted by the National Sleep Foundation found that more than half (51%) of adolescents complained of being too tired or sleepy during the day, and nearly two in ten (19%) said they fell asleep at school. The amount of sleep a teenager gets affects how he or she thinks, feels, looks & acts.

  • Not getting enough sleep or having sleep difficulties can:
  • Limit the ability to learn, listen, concentrate & solve problems
  • Make you more prone to pimples. Lack of sleep can contribute to acne and other skin problems
  • Lead to aggressive or inappropriate behavior such as yelling at friends or being impatient with teachers or family members
  • Cause poor eating habits and cause you to eat too much or eat unhealthy foods like sweets and fried foods that lead to weight gain
  • Heighten the effects of alcohol and possibly increase use of caffeine and nicotine
  • Contribute to illness, not using equipment safely or driving drowsy

Early to bed, early to rise

Many of our teens are falling asleep in class, arriving late to school, feeling down, & driving drowsy because of a lack of sleep. What’s more, parents are mostly in the dark about their adolescents’ sleep. While most students know they’re not getting the sleep they need, most parents believe that their adolescent is getting enough sleep during the school week. Sleep is vital to a teens well-being, as important as the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. It can even help manage the stress of being a teen.

10 simple sleep tips for teens

  1. Sleep on a good bed like Sealy Posturepedic.
  2. Make sleep a priority.
  3. Keep consistency in mind. Establish a regular routine.
  4. Encourage your teen to sleep between 8-1/2 to 9 hours a night.
  5. Be mindful of stimulants. Decrease consumption of caffeine in the afternoon including sodas.
  6. Like kids, wind-down before bedtime. Avoid activities that keep the mind racing like video games or heavy studying.
  7. Say no to all-nighters. Get a good night’s sleep before exams.
  8. Ensure there is enough time to wind down before bedtime.
  9. Make compromises when it comes to extracurricular activities.
  10. Talk to your teens about the importance of sleep.

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Adults and Sleep

Getting the restful sleep you need is a lot easier when you know how to get it. Sleep debt is the result of not getting the sleep you need to perform at your best the next day and it can cost you. Fortunately, there are effective methods for preventing sleep debt.

Sleep Debt

Does it often take you more than 30 minutes to fall asleep at night? Do you wake up frequently during the night or too early in the morning, and have a hard time going back to sleep? Do you feel groggy and lethargic when you wake in the morning? Consider... a person who loses one night’s sleep will generally be irritable & clumsy during the next day and will either become tired easily or speed up because of adrenalin. After missing two night’s sleep, a person will have problems concentrating and will begin to make mistakes on normal tasks. Three missed nights and a person will start to hallucinate and lose grasp of reality.

Sleep needs vary

Sleep needs vary. In general, most healthy adults need seven to nine hours of sleep a night. However, some individuals are able to function without sleepiness or drowsiness after as little as 6 hours of sleep. Others can’t perform at their peak unless they have slept 10 hours.

If you have trouble staying alert during boring or monotonous situations when fatigue is often “unmasked,” you probably aren’t getting enough good-quality sleep.

Insomnia

The word “insomnia” comes from the Latin in (“no”) and somnus (“sleep”), so it literally means “no sleep” or the inability to sleep. Insomnia is an experience of inadequate or poor quality sleep. Sleep specialists classify insomnia in two primary categories: acute & chronic. Short-term or acute insomnia, which is often due to a temporary situation such as stress, jet lag, change or loss in a job or relationship, can last up to 1 month and is treatable. It is important to address the underlying cause.

Long-term or chronic insomnia, which is experienced for a month or longer, can be secondary to causes such as medical, physical or psychological conditions, another sleep disorder or medications and substances. It’s essential to get a medical diagnosis.

10 simple sleep tips for adults

  1. Sleep on a good bed like Sealy Posturepedic
  2. Establish a regular bedtime routine and a regular sleep schedule
  3. Keep consistency in mind. Establish a regular routine
  4. Do not eat or drink too much before bedtime
  5. Avoid alcohol & nicotine, especially close to bedtime
  6. Keep a “sleep diary” for two weeks to record sleep and health habits; share this record with your doctor or other healthcare professional.
  7. Avoid naps, particularly in the late afternoon or evening
  8. Exercise, but not within three hours before bedtime
  9. Create a sleep-promoting environment that is quiet, dark, cool and comfortable
  10. Avoid allowing pets or children sleeping in your bed

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Seniors and Sleep

Are you aware that sleeping well could be your key to aging well? As a senior, it is understandable if you are having sleep troubles. According to the National Sleep Foundation, about two-thirds of older adults experience one or more symptoms of a sleep problem at least a few nights a week.

Common sleeping problems

As people age, they tend to have a harder time falling asleep and more trouble staying asleep than when they were younger. It is a common misconception that sleep needs decline with age. In fact, research demonstrates that our sleep needs remain constant throughout adulthood. Changes in the patterns of our sleep - what specialists call “sleep architecture” - occur as we age, and this may contribute to sleep problems.

Sleep needs vary

Sleep needs vary. In general, most healthy adults need seven to nine hours of sleep a night. However, some individuals are able to function without sleepiness or drowsiness after as little as 6 hours of sleep. Others can’t perform at their peak unless they have slept 10 hours.

If you have trouble staying alert during boring or monotonous situations when fatigue is often “unmasked,” you probably aren’t getting enough good-quality sleep.

Insomnia and aging

The prevalence of insomnia is higher among older adults. 44 percent of older persons experience one or more of the nighttime symptoms of insomnia at least a few nights per week or more. Insomnia may be chronic (lasting over one month) or acute (lasting a few days or weeks) and is often related to an underlying cause such as a medical or psychiatric condition.

The prevalence of insomnia is higher among older people. Rates of insomnia increase as a function of age, but most often the sleep disturbance is attributable to some other medical condition. Some medications can lead to insomnia, including those taken for colds and allergies, high blood pressure, heart disease, thyroid disease, asthma, pain medications and depression (especially some antidepressants).

It is worthwhile to speak to your doctor about insomnia symptoms and about any effects these symptoms may have. Your doctor can help assess how serious a problem it is and what to do about it.

10 simple sleep tips for seniors

  1. Sleep on a good bed like Sealy Posturepedic
  2. Establish a regular bedtime routine and a regular sleep schedule
  3. Keep consistency in mind. Establish a regular routine
  4. Do not eat or drink too much before bedtime
  5. Avoid alcohol & nicotine, especially close to bedtime
  6. Keep a “sleep diary” for two weeks to record sleep and health habits; share this record with your doctor or other healthcare professional
  7. Avoid naps, particularly in the late afternoon or evening
  8. Exercise, but not within three hours before bedtime
  9. Create a sleep-promoting environment that is quiet, dark, cool and comfortable
  10. Talk to your doctor about your sleep habits

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